Better Search with Google

Google search box

Google is the most common search engine in the world. It’s likely that you used Google the last time that you wanted to look up something. How good are your search skills when using Google’s search engine?

9 Tips for Searching using Google Search

  • use the most accurate words possible in creating your query
  • ignore case and aim for correct spelling, but Google will suggest alternate spelling
  • put @ in front of a word to search social media
  • put # in front of a word to search hashtags
  • put in front of a word you’d like to exclude from the search e.g. -metal
  • use quotation marks to find an exact match e.g. “prague spring”
  • use OR to search for one of two or more things e.g. prague OR paris
  • use site: to search within a site e.g. site:.cz to find Czech websites
  • search for a file type e.g. filetype:pptx to find PowerPoint files

Quick Search Features in Google Search

Things that you can do in the Google search box (or the Chrome Omnibox):

  • define Omniboxtype define in front of  a word to get its definition
  • type weather and the name of a city to know the weather in that city e.g. weather prague
  • perform calculations by typing a formula
  • perform unit conversions e.g. 200 eur in usd

Bonus Search Tips

Make it all the way to the end for the rapid fire sharing!

Continue reading

Newsela in the Classroom

Overview

Welcome Back, Teachers. from Newsela on Vimeo.

Newsela is primarily an online news site that provides access to high-quality news articles, each of which is written at five different reading levels. The original article is presented as the highest Lexile level.

Newsela has integrated features that allow assessments by teachers. As users read a story, they can annotate the content for deeper engagement with the material to develop understanding. They can also take a four questions quiz after reading the article to check for understanding. Teachers may also assign a writing prompt to students. Students store their assessments into binders, where they can later review their work. Teachers can see class data in aggregate with the free features, and have to upgrade to Pro for individual student information.

Newsela organises news articles into different categories, including Science Law, Math, Arts. The news are curated from sources such as Associated Press, the Washington Post, The Guardian, Scientific American, Smithsonian, Atlas Obscura, AlJazeera and others. Many of the news stories have been translated into Spanish as well. Although news is the primary resource on Newsela, there is also a library that includes primary sources, biographies, famous speeches, myths and legends, etc. Newsela also organises content into text sets which curates material from the website around a particular central topic or theme. Teachers can use existing text sets or curate their own text sets. Teachers can also access and used “paired texts” which are made up of two articles on a theme or topic. The writing prompt for paired texts requires students to use evidence from both texts.

Dashboard

Teachers set up students into classes in Newsela and select a reading level for each student. The system is responsive and adjusts a student’s level after 8-10 quizzes.

Grade Levels

Newsela is meant for use in Grades 2 – 12. Newsela elementary mirrors the parts of the main site that are for elementary school students. The premium option is called Newsela Pro.

Why use Newsela

Use Newsela to help students build background knowledge and vocabulary around a topic, and knowledge of current events. Provide differentiation in the classroom by letting students high-quality documents at their individual reading level, so that they can access the same content at a level appropriate to their individual progress.

How to Use Newsela in the Classroom

  • use articles and texts for students to develop background information
  • provide examples of concepts from the real-world
  • expose students to the real-world vocabulary around an issue
  • access additional information or context on a subject
  • use the five w’s or other frameworks to help children learning about their world
  • find articles that spark iTime explorations
  • explore the pros and cons of a controversial issue through news and articles
  • read articles related to personal interest

Main Uses

  • debates
  • persuasive and opinion writing
  • discussions
  • comparing and contrasting
  • summarising
  • reading and comprehension

Platforms

Subject Area

All

Professional Development

 There is a built-in learning and support centre, which provides a variety of resources, including sample lesson plans and information about how to use various features and articles in Newsela.

Adoption

According to the About page, it is used by over one million educators. Customers include Chicago Public Schools, Newark Public Schools and KIPP Foundation.

Login integrations

Google account logins available

Reviews

Foster Wonder and Curiosity with DKfindout

DKfindout! is a great website for children that works on smart phones, tablets and (other) computers. It can be used at home or at school for children (and adults) “to see, learn, and explore almost everything” (homepage). The content is from DK, with support for parents and teachers. If you are a parent, take a look around the site to see how you can use it for supporting wonder and curiosity in your child(ren).

Topics on DKfindout

Topics on DKfindout!

For teachers, DKfindout! provides catalogued resources, in the form of curriculum-linked resources, by subject or topic. Users can also find out about braille, festivals and holidays, special events around the world, and politicians in More Find Out. The site is currently celebrating Women’s History Month during the month of March.

 

Teachers can make an account and create lesson plans, collecting and organizing the material that they want to share with students. Go to DKfindout! and check out the resources available there. If you use it in your classroom, I’d love to hear how in the comments.

Screen Shot 2016-03-10 at 10.44.47

Research on Coaching

This post is part of a larger series based on the book Coaching Approaches & Perspectives edited by Jim Knight. Visit the Coaching category for other related posts.

The final chapter of Coaching Approaches & Perspectives is written by Jake Cornett and Jim Knight on the topic of Research on Coaching. Quantitative research is (ethically) difficult in education. The analysis that Cornett and Knight have done of the existing research reveals a problem of validity and reliability due to problematic methods. There is also a dearth of of quantitative/experimental research on the effectiveness of coaching for increasing student achievement. The existing research suggests that coaching is effective in professional development by increasing implementation and understanding of programs and models by teachers. For research to guide practice, educators need more reliable and valid research on the structures that allow coaching to work and the instances when coaching is effective. Educators could also benefit from research that shows the types of coaching that are effective, for who they are effective, and when they are effective. For example, when is one-on-one, small group, autonomous online, and other types of coaching effective for working with teachers? What’s the appropriate use of modeling in professional development? Questions abound, and there are currently more questions than answers.

It’s been six years since the book was published. I wonder how the scope of research has changed in that time. I would like to determine the intersection of technology coaching with the ten types of coaching identified in this book. Although I am done reading this book, my inquiry is far from complete. My next steps are to identify my learning from this book, to extract the components relevant to my work, and to identify interventions that I will apply to my work based on what I learned in this book. I’ve also joined a MOOC on Technology Coaching. A key question for me is how can I leverage social networking and online communication to create the supportive network important to my own professional growth?

If you’ve read any recent research/books/articles on Technology Coaching that you found inspiring or empowering, please share them with me in the comments.

Book Citation: Knight, J. (Ed.). (2008). Coaching: Approaches and perspectives. Corwin Press.

Who Wrote That? Authority Online

On January 22, Google added a feature to search to help you verify the authority of publishers online. This information automatically shows up in your search results when “when a site is widely recognized as notable online, when there is enough information to show or when the content may be handy for you”. Read the Google blog post to see what else Google had to say about this change.

I was trying to share this feature with a colleague today and it had dissappeared. Well, not really. As it turns out, the extra information showed up when I performed searches on google.com but not when I used a regional google search page such as google.ca or google.cz. This extra information shows up as a grey hyperlink to the right of the site URL.

google search

The search on the right is done in google.com; the one on the left is done in google.cz.

When you click on the grey arrow, a dropdown box provides information taken from Wikipedia about the organization responsible for publishing the web page, as in the case of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences shown below.

Image showing drop down box providing information about the website responsible for publishing the page.

Image showing drop down box providing information about the website responsible for publishing the page.

I think that this is  a great feature to help people evaluate websites. However, one shouldn’t depend on it too much. For example, the Missouri botanical gardens is likely a reliable source on water pollution but my search didn’t provide any gray indicator of additional information to suggest credibility.