Differentiated Coaching: The Coaching Plan

The final step in differentiated coaching is to create a coaching plan. An information gathering sheet can be completed in any order to record the coaching styles and strategies that the coach thinks will be most effective for providing evidence that could change teacher beliefs.

Coaches have to work the hardest when working with teachers who have an opposite personality type. Completing this four step differentiated coaching process may complicate coaching, but it provides a framework where the coach can achieve success with all teachers. Success is defined as interventions resulting in greater student learning, providing clear evidence of improvement that can challenge and change teacher beliefs.

Differentiated coaching makes sense to me. I know that I respond best to coaching styles that match my Mayers-Briggs Type Indicator. It stands to reason that the same would be true of other educators. It would be useful to know the personality types of colleagues; this information could make coaching them more successful, and a more pleasant experience for both parties. We know the importance of student centered teaching and learning; it is also true of adult education and professional development.

This post is part of a larger series based on the book Coaching Approaches & Perspectives edited by Jim Knight. This post is based on sections of Chapter 7: Differentiated Coaching. Visit the Coaching category for other related posts.

Book Citation: Knight, J. (Ed.). (2008). Coaching: Approaches and perspectives. Corwin Press.

Differentiated Coaching: Identifying the Problem

After steps one and two, it’s time to identify the problem that the teacher wants to solve. Kise cautions that the coach may need to help the teacher identify the problem to solve. The problem to solve is the biggest one, the one that affects other goals. The coach may have to probe to discover this problem; the teacher may identify a problem that is secondary. Cognitive coaching may be the ideal model but the coach may need to be more directive to meet the needs of certain teachers.

Kise has provided a template of an information gathering sheet that records the personality types of the teacher and coach, beliefs, goals, roles and evidence of success. The form is a good reminder to me of the importance of recording coaching practice and reflecting on the process of coaching to improve my coaching practice,

This post is part of a larger series based on the book Coaching Approaches & Perspectives edited by Jim Knight. This post is based on sections of Chapter 7: Differentiated Coaching. Visit the Coaching category for other related posts.

Book Citation: Knight, J. (Ed.). (2008). Coaching: Approaches and perspectives. Corwin Press.

Differentiated Coaching: Identifying Teacher Beliefs

The second step in differentiated coaching, after hypothesizing personality type, is identifying teacher beliefs.

Kise gives evidence in this section that teachers do not examine practices that align with their beliefs, so to change practice, coaches need to address beliefs.

Teacher beliefs about coaching come into play. Different personality types have different perceptions of the role of a coach. Kise presents a table of the four coaching types with practical advice for coaches working with individuals of each type. The four types are ST, SF, NF and NT.

It would be useful for me to reflect further on the four coaching types and use the ideas presented there to inform my work with teachers. Kise presents a table with ideas of the information, evidence and interaction/coaching style most suitable to each personality type. I found it interesting to learn more about my personality type, with an explanation/confirmation of the type of mentoring/coaching that I respond to best.

This post is part of a larger series based on the book Coaching Approaches & Perspectives edited by Jim Knight. This post is based on sections of Chapter 7: Differentiated Coaching. Visit the Coaching category for other related posts.

Book Citation: Knight, J. (Ed.). (2008). Coaching: Approaches and perspectives. Corwin Press.

Differentiated Coaching: Hypothesizing Personality Type

Mayers-Briggs Type Indicator determines a person’s personality type along four axes.

Introversion versus Extroversion: Introverts get energy from time alone while extroverts get energy from other people.

Sensing versus Intuition: Sensing people like data and details about decisions/ideas while intuitive people like the big picture (vision).

Thinking versus Feeling: Thinking people like to use data and standards for decisions while Feeling people prefer to use relationships and values to make decisions.

Judging versus Perceiving: Judging People like clear processes, constraints and timelines to minimize surprises while perceiving people like more flexible and open plans.

How would you define yourself? What type of colleagues do you work best with? What type of colleagues do you need to make more effort to work better with?

Ms. Kise explains that Introversion/Extroversion informs the coach on the best way to interact with the teacher, and Judging/Perceiving explains the teacher’s natural preference for planning and closure. This leaves four types which define how teachers prefer to receive information and make decisions. Table 7.1 of Type Preferences and Coaching Implications is a useful resource for coaches to consider how to best work with teachers who may have a preference that is different to that of the coach.

Image by Jake Beech via Wikicommons, License: CC BY-SA 3.0

Image by Jake Beech via Wikicommons, License: CC BY-SA 3.0

This post is part of a larger series based on the book Coaching Approaches & Perspectives edited by Jim Knight. This post is based on sections of Chapter 7: Differentiated Coaching. Visit the Coaching category for other related posts.

Book Citation: Knight, J. (Ed.). (2008). Coaching: Approaches and perspectives. Corwin Press.

 

Differentiated Coaching

Chapter 7 by Jane A. G. Kise is called Differentiated Coaching, and looks at how to use personality types to determine the coaching approach to use with a teacher. This is fascinating to me as team leaders at my school recently completed the Mayers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and we had a session with Marc Frankel of Triangle Associates on what the MBTI tells us (more on my type in a future post).

One thing that became clear in looking at the results of team leaders here which is reiterated in the chapter is that some personality types are not represented amongst educators. Ms. Kise talks about the importance of knowing personality types to address teacher beliefs which affect teacher practices. This reminded of me of my masters thesis which shared research that shows that beliefs are directly tied to practice.

Learning style is important in coaching because it affects teachers’ natural style, practices beliefshow they relate to data and information, and how they make decisions. Using learning style with teachers has the following components which Ms. Kise explores further in the chapter: hypothesizing type, identifying beliefs, identifying the challenge the teacher wants to overcome, and developing a coaching plan.

This post is part of a larger series based on the book Coaching Approaches & Perspectives edited by Jim Knight. This post is based on sections of Chapter 7: Differentiated Coaching. Visit the Coaching category for other related posts.

Book Citation: Knight, J. (Ed.). (2008). Coaching: Approaches and perspectives. Corwin Press.