Take Control of Your Privacy

Do you ever feel a bit freaked out about what the Internet knows about you? Do advertisements ever seem to be too well targeted to you? Do you want to take control of  your privacy? Join a week of challenges as part of the Privacy Paradox.

Listen to the introductory show about the privacy paradox.

One of my favorite podcasts is Note to Self. I subscribed to it a few months back, and have listened to every episode since then, as well as some of the earlier episodes. In the most recent episodes, I learned about the Privacy Paradox. You can listen to the podcast to learn about it here. And if you’re interested, you can sign up, or just keep track of the pages where the information will be uploaded, and access them later without signing up.

The challenge begins February 6. You still have time to sign up, and join others taking the journey.

“In the five-day interactive project, we’ll help you understand where your personal information goes online, weigh the trade-offs and then make more thoughtful digital decisions. Tackling digital privacy can feel overwhelming. So let’s do it together.” – Manoush Zomorodi

Slip off the Digital Leash

Do you drive your technology or does your technology drive you?

Do you feel a little lost when you forget your cell phone at home or in the car? Could you navigate through a city if all you had to depend on was a map (and speaking to locals)? I’m the first to admit that I have a close relationship with my electronic devices. There is usually one hour each day when I don’t have my cell phone within easy reach. What are the effects of this type of attachment? Well one of the effects is a propensity to multitask, a habit that’s difficult, if not impossible, to turn off. Another effect is the impact of being leashed, even if it’s self-imposed rather than forced upon you..

A Challenge For Greater Balance – 5 Things

  • Don’t check e-mail within one hour of heading to bed. Do something else during that time (preferably something that does not use electronics).
  • Turn your phone on silent, not vibrate, once in a while and give your full attention to the moment.
  • Slow down. Don’t overwhelm people with multiple modes of communication about the same topic. Choose the method based on urgency. If it’s not urgent, relax and wait for a response.
  • Every once in a while (say once a day), when you’re tempted to send an email to someone nearby, get up to find them for a conversation instead.
  • Don’t get swept in the flow. It’s okay to say No. This means that you don’t have to immediately respond to e-mail, or even pick up a phone call. You get to CHOOSE. Just because people can reach out to you doesn’t mean that you have to let them interrupt you.

Some ideas from the web

Slip off the Digital Leash

Do you drive your technology or does your technology drive you?

Do you feel a little lost when you forget your cell phone at home or in the car? Could you navigate through a city if all you had to depend on was a map (and speaking to locals)? I’m the first to admit that I have a close relationship with my electronic devices. There is usually one hour each day when I don’t have my cell phone within easy reach. What are the effects of this type of attachment? Well one of the effects is a propensity to multitask, a habit that’s difficult, if not impossible, to turn off. Another effect is the impact of being leashed, even if it’s self-imposed rather than forced upon you..

A Challenge For Greater Balance – 5 Things

  • Don’t check e-mail within one hour of heading to bed. Do something else during that time (preferably something that does not use the Internet).
  • Turn your phone on silent, not vibrate, once in a while and give your full attention to the moment.
  • Slow down. Don’t overwhelm people with multiple modes of communication about the same topic. Choose the method based on urgency. If it’s not urgent, relax and wait for a response.
  • Every once in a while (say once a day), when you’re tempted to send an email to someone nearby, get up to find them for a conversation instead.
  • Don’t get swept in the flow. It’s okay to say No. This means that you don’t have to immediately respond to e-mail, or even pick up a phone call. You get to CHOOSE. Just because people can reach out to you doesn’t mean that you have to let them interrupt you.

Some ideas from the web